Work Less, You’ll Get More Done. Honestly!

‘I’ll never get it all done in time!’ The words of someone under stress, harried and flustered. Very common, in all walks of life, not just work. It seems that the word ‘stress’ as in ‘I’m so stressed’ and ‘It’s so stressful’ have become a normal way of speaking and thinking. But what to do if you agree with these statements? Is it really possible to be less stressed AND get more done?

I know that it is, because it has happened for me. Since my husband’s death, which stopped me completely in my tracks, I was forced to find another way to work. I had no choice.

Hopefully you won’t be in that situation. Hopefully you won’t have to wait until a major life circumstance hits and you are forced to make changes.  Here’s 3 tips on how to do less but get more done.

  1. Stop thinking that stress is the problem.

Yes you may very well be facing difficult circumstances. It’s how you meet those that make them more or less stressful though.

Stress is just another word to which we have given too much power. You can lessen it’s power by remembering that how stressed you feel is actually down to how you meet your circumstances.  This is a turnaround, and definitely one of the attributes of Wild Wisdom!  So it’s not that there’s a stressful situation out there – situations are just what they are. Some are more intense than others of course, some are more challenging, but you can considerably lessen how stressful they are by thinking about them in different ways. For instance, if you’ve got a lot to get done on a day, re-prioritise. There is usually very little indeed that needs to be done by a certain time; it’s just that we get attached to a plan, or are trying to be efficient, or fit too many things in.

  1. Be willing to act on inspiration. When the muse takes you, even if you can’t do anything about it in that moment, make a note (verbal or written) of something that will remind you of it, so you can come to it later.  The reason this is important is because when you create from an inspired place, it always takes less time. (You can read here http://wildwisdom.co.uk/inspired-action-motivated-action/ more about the difference between inspired action and motivated action).

It takes practice to discover this, but here’s a story to inspire you. I had the idea just recently of creating a gift to give away to readers of my new book. The idea of it popped into my head (Grief Support Statement), I took action immediately and the content just poured out with ease. The whole thing took about half an hour, including formatting it.

  1. Set yourself a time limit and focus on the task for that time only. By doing this you’re creating a container within which your creativity can be safely unleashed. Once you’ve set the time, and are clear what the task is, take a few moments to settle in your chair. Close your eyes; let the edges of your body soften; notice your breathing. Relax. Then start your doing. This is the practical application of my mantra Stop. Be Still. Listen. And Only Then Act. When you do this, you’re opening the channels for flow to happen more easily, and when things are flowing they of course take less time.

If the back to front thinking in this article is proving hard for you to actually put into practice, and if you really WANT to work less, but produce more, then contact me.

August, traditionally a month of holidays, is not a holiday for me. Instead, I’m here to help you. 🙂 Email me with the answer to this question:

What is it about getting work done that is the most challenging for me?

And I’ll contact you to set up a time for a free Wild Wisdom conversation.

Intend or Plan – what’s the best?

I spent last weekend in a glorious renovated Victorian hunting lodge way up in the uppermost part of Scotland, amongst the heather, lochs and the deer, celebrating a friend’s 50th birthday party. It was a time full of conversation, walking, fine food and wine, and simple, ordinary pleasure.  Here’s a pic:

Tim Slack Appreciating People croppedThe man I’m sitting next to is Tim Slack of Appreciating People . He told me about the idea of Commander’s Intent, a military term used to describe what a successful mission looks like, and it’s not about having a plan and sticking to it.  It’s about having an intention.

Commander’s Intent fully recognizes the chaos, lack of a complete information picture, changes in enemy situation, and other relevant factors that may make a plan either completely or partially obsolete when it is executed. The role of Commander’s Intent is to empower subordinates and guide their initiative and improvisation as they adapt the plan to the changed battlefield environment. Commander’s Intent empowers initiative, improvisation, and adaptation by providing guidance of what a successful conclusion looks like. Commander’s Intent is vital in chaotic, demanding, and dynamic environments.

If we transpose the word ‘successful leader’ instead of commander’s intent, it reads

A successful leader fully recognizes the chaos, lack of a complete information picture, changes in situation, and other relevant factors that may make a plan either completely or partially obsolete when it is executed. The role of a successful leader is to empower others and guide their initiative and improvisation as they adapt the plan to the changed environment. A successful leader empowers initiative, improvisation, and adaptation by providing guidance of what a successful conclusion looks like. A successful leader is vital in chaotic, demanding, and dynamic environments.

You may not recognize yourself as a leader, especially if you are not employing others in your business. But you are – you are the leader of your own organization, even if it is just yourself you are leading. Remember Louise L. Hay, founder of Hay House Publishing, who was 88 just the other day.  She began by self-publishing her ‘Little Blue Book’ way back in the early seventies and running her first workshop for a handful of people in her living room.  She started leading herself, and slowly and steadily, step by step, employed others to help her get her message out to many more people.

So do you have an intention for your business, or do you have a plan?  Perhaps you have neither, of course. The only challenge with neither is that it is very easy to get distracted with tempting opportunities that may lead to you never completing anything, not following up with someone, or ending up wandering around with no sense of accomplishment or purpose. Not that that is bad, of course, but it may be somewhat dissatisfying.

But a plan according to Appreciating People is at the other end of the spectrum, and  too limiting. However, an intention allows for flexibility, clarity of purpose and simplicity.

Which falls in line with the blog post I wrote a while back about ID’s (intention-directions)

Finally, remember Eisenhower’s quote: ‘Plans are nothing, planning is everything’.

So I ask you today – what is your intention for your business over the next three years?  Remember, keep it simple, clear and flexible.

If you can say it one sentence all the better – it can always be padded out. Mine is to enable many more thousands of people to tap into their own Wild Wisdom and use it to affect their businesses and the lives of others in a positive manner – I have various ways I’m currently operating to do that, but in essence that is it.  What’s yours?

How to cope when your heart drops at the very word ‘goals’.


Does your heart drop when you hear the word goal or goal setting? Or even New Year resolutions?   Have you gone off goals in a big way because of just not achieving them? Or realize you give up on your resolutions somewhere around the end of January? 

Dare I say it, have you even gone off setting an intention, or manifesting what you want? Perhaps because even if it did happen in the past, it didn’t turn out quite how you wanted?

I’ve definitely been in that place. Continue reading

Is there life after Christmas?


At this time of year, this is a question I often ask myself as I see so many 
people focusing on the ‘ big day’ and the associated holidays. And even if 
you have your own business, and know that life doesn’t stop just because 
Christmas is coming, it’s easy to get sucked into the idea that your internal
 diary stops at Christmas and New Year and doesn’t start up again until 
after it’ s all over. If you find yourself arriving in January thinking ‘ whew, 
that’s it for another year, now what?’ then take heart. Continue reading

How to Cope When You’ve Outgrown Your Business Part 3: Discovering Who Your Perfect Clients Are

‘Even when I dropped my prices really low, these people still said it was too expensive!’

My client was aghast. She just couldn’t believe that a steady stream of people coming through the centre where she rented a room were simply not interested in taking advantage of even a taste of her treatment, which she knew could help them.

‘It seems like they just want to stay the way they are’, she wailed.

And she was right. The particular people she was referring to were not interested in returning to full health using her method, even if they said they were. And she ended up feeling really frustrated and questioning what she was doing and why.

The problem was, she had not been targeting the kind of people who were an ideal match to what she was offering. This was because she knew her treatments could benefit all kinds of ailments, and so she naturally wanted to offer these to everyone.

The challenge with this is that by scattering your seed wide, so to speak, you lessen the chances of it falling in the exact place where the conditions are right for it to germinate. Continue reading